Black Holes as Gentle Portals?

At last!

Pop the cork and pour the champagne. The last book in the Terran Trilogy is published.

Weight of Gravity.  By me.

Now I just how to figure out the marketing and letting my readers know about it. Spread the word.

A lot of advisors urge authors to begin marketing months in advance, but it worked out better that no firm date was set and no program was in place. That would have been embarrassing because the Beta readers delayed, my cover artist had life setbacks, and the holiday interrupted my work. Then the editing began.

And now, the final publishing date has been made all the sweeter.  YEA.

In this final Terran version, Elise lands on the planet Alysia, but her start there is a struggle. Terrans and Alysians clash. The Alysians abduct several female invaders to sell into a slave ring, and Richard Steele is called upon to find them and get them back … two from the harem of Khalib Allfyre.

I love a desert adventure.

But that is the least of his problems. Time-traveling daughter Tempest shows up from the future to warn him of a probable attack from hostile aliens. He scrambles to once again set up a defense for Alysia.

This time, the ships are identified as part of the Fleet of the Fallen, the ships that attacked both Elise’s fleet and Braden Steele’s ships. Definitely hostile, they are searching to take over Alysia and make it their own.

I love this story and there’s a lot of action and character interaction in it.

But I do want to stand on my soapbox and rant a bit. Because when you have a blog, you can … judiciously.

When an author writes science fiction, he or she deals a lot in imagination mixed with science. Some of that science, such as wormholes, faster than light travel, and other stuff is accepted in the science fiction circles while not fully proven in the real realm.

One thing I hear constantly repeated in the many documentaries I view is the scientists saying that what they found was not what they expected. I’m amazed at how new discoveries are radically changing our knowledge and vision of the universe since my days of studying astronomy in high school.

Even worse, my father earnestly said that we would never leave the Earth because we didn’t have enough power to get the velocity to escape Earth’s gravity.

Well … that proved to be false. Ask a few astronauts,

And, our knowledge continues to expand as we send out more and more probes and craft such as the Voyager 1 and now Voyager 2, which just left our solar system for interstellar space.

We’re finally getting out there for a better look, but the going is slow due to the vast distances we have to travel. Until we see up close, then, we can’t know for certain what a black hole is or how it reacts. In fact, not many years ago, they were considered merely theoretical, and non-existent by some.

Now we accept them, and in fact, scientists are saying there is one at the center of most solar systems. They also add that there are several types of black holes, each with different behaviors. After reading the following report, I decided to include a black hole in my first book, A World Too Far, because, it was just too juicy an item to leave out of a spacefaring story. Because this genre is called science fiction, I wove the known science and my imagination together to serve the story.

Ask Ray Bradbury if that can work.

But a few readers protested the scene.

What I want to say is that we know very little about black holes, even now. In fact in the following link, Gauray Khanna, Professor of Physics at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth and his Ph.D. student Caroline Mallary built a computer model in 2016 that captured the essential physical effects on a spacecraft, or any large object, falling into a large rotating black hole like Sagittarius A. Professors Khanna and Lior Burko have been investigating the physics of black holes for over two decades, so they are not novices to the subject.

What Mallary discovered was that “under all conditions an object falling into a rotating black hole would not experience infinitely large effects upon passage through the hole’s so-called inner horizon singularity.”
Not only that, … “under the right circumstances, these effects may be negligibly small, allowing for a rather comfortable passage through the singularity.”

In the film, Interstellar, Cooper (Matthew McConaughey’s character) survived his fall into a supermassive rotating black hole.

No one blinked. No one ranted. The response was…science fiction… how interesting.

At least as far as I’m aware.

So, believe it or not, I do a lot of research for my stories, and then add in imagination that serves the story. In fact, for Weight of Gravity, I used an actual transcript from a shuttle launch at NASA to try to get the dialogue right.

Okay, I’m going to step down. But I want to point out that there is a lot we still have to learn about our universe and possible other universes out there, and no one has all the answers yet.

But isn’t it fun to speculate?

Here’s the link for the whole story:https://theconversation.com/rotating-black-holes-may-serve-as-gentle-portals-for-hyperspace-travel-107062

Spring is on its way. Unfortunately, this weekend, so is possible snow.

Stay warm and read a good book. I’ve got a good suggestion. (see above)

7 Comments

Filed under Cutting Edge Science ideas, first contact, science fiction, science fiction science, science fiction series, time travel

7 responses to “Black Holes as Gentle Portals?

  1. Congrats on the completion of your series, Sheron. Phew! Another one down. What’s coming up next?

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  2. A break. My muse stomped out and said she needed a vacation. I held the door open and handed her a backpack. I pointed out that she was always welcome but I would be painting and reading until she returned.

    She nodded and waved goodbye as she skipped down the path.

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  3. I love how Science goes, ‘this is the way, and it is the only way (and it is my way) … and then their next-door-neighbor makes a discovery which changes everything, and Science goes, ‘well, we’re always learning new things,’ … and then goes ahead and pontificates on the next ‘known’ thing in exactly the same manner. 😀

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    • Yep. I understand that some things are set in stone.. For example gravity on Earth, but there’s so much to learn beyond planet Earth that we don’t know yet. The universe is a strange and exciting place. And our knowledge of it keeps changing.
      Have a great day and thanks for the support.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Huge congrats! I know how it feels – enjoy !!!

    My guess is that your muse will keep in touch 😉

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    • She does have a way of coming home. I think it’s to raid the refrigerator, but sometimes it’s to spark a story.

      As a good friend is known to sigh, “We’ll see.”

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  5. Yikes! I need to make a correction. When I said scientists are suggesting that there is a black hole at the center of most solar systems, I meant to say they are said to be at the center of most galaxies.

    The solar system is our system…for Sol, our sun. Stellar systems are other systems with a sun, or suns. Galaxies are made up of these systems…yeah, I know fourth grade science.

    Abject apologies to all, and thanks to Thomas Weaver for catching my error. Check him out at northofandover.wordpress.com. Good stuff there.

    Deep breath, Thomas… sorry, sorry.
    And thanks for reading.

    Like

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